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Life in the US Forces during WWII in the Territory

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Members of the US 147th Field Artillery at 40 Mile Camp, near Acacia Hills, in front of M1934 tents
Members of the US 147th Field Artillery at 40 Mile Camp, near Acacia Hills, in front of M1934 tents

 

An extract from a letter sent on the 13th of December 1943 by a corporal serving in the supply office of the 528th Bomb Squadron, 380th Bomb Group USAAF at Fenton Field to his wife and child in North Carolina, USA. In it he expresses the sense of isolation he feels serving in the Northern Territory, an isolation felt more keenly during the holiday period.
An extract from a letter sent on the 13th of December 1943 by a corporal serving in the supply office of the 528th Bomb Squadron, 380th Bomb Group USAAF at Fenton Field to his wife and child in North Carolina, USA. In it he expresses the sense of isolation he feels serving in the Northern Territory, an isolation felt more keenly during the holiday period

 

A letter sent on the 31st of July 1943 by a corporal serving in the supply office of the 528th Bomb Squadron, 380th Bomb Group USAAF at Fenton Field to his son in North Carolina, USA. The letter begins by asking about his sons recent camp during the summer vacation period, moving onto how the 380th Bomb Group has being seeing some action, possibly a reference to the 30th of June and 6th of July raids on Fenton Field by the Japanese. He also states that some Japanese aircraft have been destroyed by the 380th Bomb Group since their arrival at Fenton. He talks about the general progress of the war and how busy he is, and that he has seen many different animals including Kangaroos and parrots. He closes by suggesting that his son receives good grades at school and that if he wants anything from Australia he will try and procure it for him.
A letter sent on the 31st of July 1943 by a corporal serving in the supply office of the 528th Bomb Squadron, 380th Bomb Group USAAF at Fenton Field to his son in North Carolina, USA. The letter begins by asking about his sons recent camp during the summer vacation period, moving onto how the 380th Bomb Group has being seeing some action, possibly a reference to the 30th of June and 6th of July raids on Fenton Field by the Japanese. He also states that some Japanese aircraft have been destroyed by the 380th Bomb Group since their arrival at Fenton. He talks about the general progress of the war and how busy he is, and that he has seen many different animals including Kangaroos and parrots. He closes by suggesting that his son receives good grades at school and that if he wants anything from Australia he will try and procure it for him.

 

An extract from a letter sent on the 11th of August 1943 by a corporal serving in the supply office of the 528th Bomb Squadron, 380th Bomb Group USAAF at Fenton Field to his wife and child in North Carolina, USA. In it he encloses the emblem of the Australian Military Forces (2nd AIF) for his son who collected coins and badges, explaining that it cost him many weeks supplies of cigarettes. In the early days following the 380th's arrival at Fenton Field around May and June of 1943, supplies of comfort items were hard to obtain and cigarettes, particularly the brand, 'Lucky Strikes', became a form of currency amongst American Airmen, who used these to barter for goods and other items from their Australian compatriots. He also talks about the excessively hot and humid climate of the Northern Territory and how he finds it difficult to perform duties after mid day.
An extract from a letter sent on the 11th of August 1943 by a corporal serving in the supply office of the 528th Bomb Squadron, 380th Bomb Group USAAF at Fenton Field to his wife and child in North Carolina, USA. In it he encloses the emblem of the Australian Military Forces (2nd AIF) for his son who collected coins and badges, explaining that it cost him many weeks supplies of cigarettes. In the early days following the 380th's arrival at Fenton Field around May and June of 1943, supplies of comfort items were hard to obtain and cigarettes, particularly the brand, 'Lucky Strikes', became a form of currency amongst American Airmen, who used these to barter for goods and other items from their Australian compatriots. He also talks about the excessively hot and humid climate of the Northern Territory and how he finds it difficult to perform duties after mid day.

 

A letter sent on the 12th of Novemeber 1943 by a corporal serving in the supply office of the 528th Bomb Squadron, 380th Bomb Group USAAF at Fenton Field to his wife and child in North Carolina, USA. In it he talks about the flurry of activity caused by the last official air raid conducted on the Northern Territory. He also gives his opinions on the different forms of entertainment to be had at Fenton Base Camp, expressing a dislike for the type of movies shown in the evening. He continues onto talk about one of his friends at home and gives details of type of country and livestock and other animals present in the Northern Territory and the rest Australia. As a member of a supply unit, he traveled quite extensively. He closes by wishing everyone at home well, adding that he is actively seeking stamps for his sons stamp collection.
A letter sent on the 12th of Novemeber 1943 by a corporal serving in the supply office of the 528th Bomb Squadron, 380th Bomb Group USAAF at Fenton Field to his wife and child in North Carolina, USA. In it he talks about the flurry of activity caused by the last official air raid conducted on the Northern Territory. He also gives his opinions on the different forms of entertainment to be had at Fenton Base Camp, expressing a dislike for the type of movies shown in the evening. He continues onto talk about one of his friends at home and gives details of type of country and livestock and other animals present in the Northern Territory and the rest Australia. As a member of a supply unit, he traveled quite extensively. He closes by wishing everyone at home well, adding that he is actively seeking stamps for his sons stamp collection.